So I'm pretty much Sherlocked at the moment, but I'm also gay for Doctor Who, the Avengers, Harry Potter and Pokemon. And I suck at this Tumblr thing.


rosewolfy:

68/100 pictures of Billie Piper

(via twotwentyonebbakerst)

beawilderment:

he’s making it hop

this is the only thing I care about

(Source: -everdeen, via twotwentyonebbakerst)

flipphones:

the most important thing i’ve learnt in all my years is that it is a terrible idea to drink from a cup while lying down

(Source: strocka, via i-was-so-alone-i-owe-you-so-much)

How odd, I can have all this inside me
and to you it’s just words.

David Foster Wallace’s, The Pale King (via poetisch)

(Source: nequiquam, via under-seas)

Don’t touch Steve’s friends.

(Source: mishasteaparty, via geothebio)

It’s hard to shake the idea that Game Of Thrones, the show, doesn’t see a problem with pushing a scene from complicated, consensual sex to outright rape. It would be easier to accept that idea if it were clear what the show was trying to do with those changes. Rape is a tricky thing to use as character development, for either the victim or the rapist; doing it twice raises a lot of red flags. It assumes that rape between characters doesn’t fundamentally change the rest of their story—and it assumes that the difference between consent and rape is, to use the parlance, a “blurred line.”

Unfortunately, the show is wrong, on both counts. Changing a scene from consensual sex to rape is not just a pedantic issue of accuracy—it’s a problem with story. The Daenerys Targaryen who falls in love with a man who granted her respect when no one else would is different from the Daenerys Targaryen who fell in love with her rapist. It changes that relationship. (Dany falling in love with Drogo, and calling him her “sun and stars,” makes a whole lot more sense now, doesn’t it?)

Similarly, Jaime is a figure of chivalric love in the books—despite his arrogance and ruthlessness, his devotion and sense of duty to Cersei, the only woman he has ever loved, is so fervent as to border on adoration. Admittedly, the show can’t rely on his point-of-view chapters, as the book does, to communicate that love. But given what we have seen Cersei Lannister capable of—her ex-husband is hardly the only man she’s had killed—is it even conceivable that she would stand for it? Jaime raping Cersei is a major anomaly for these two characters—even based purely on what we’ve seen in the show. It’s just not something that either character would do.


Sonia Saraiya, Rape of Thrones: Why are the Game of Thrones showrunners rewriting the books into misogyny? (via starringmarlonbrando)

(Source: thedespicablemouse, via loki-vs-thor)

gallifreyanconsultingdetective:

dianeraeb:

siriuus:

do action movies know they can have more than one female character

Someone should make an action movie with all girls except for one guy and have no explanation or mention of it in the movie and then pay all of the actors to act surprised like they’d never noticed when they get the inevitable storm of questions. 

This one male must have a shower scene, be saved by the protagonist at least once, and fall in love with a lead female.

(via idontfeellikesleeping)

misterjakes:

Obviously, they are not making cat doors as big as they used to.

(via fujoshiism)

drearycheery:

Tokyo Godfathers.


This my friends, is a masterpiece of a movie. Three homeless people, A runaway teen, a alcoholic father, and an ageing trans woman, are wandering the streets on Christmas eve, when they find a baby abandoned in a dump.  They decide to care for it, while they wander around trying to find her mother, meeting several oddballs on their way.

Directed by the great Satoshi Kon, this movie is a must watch for anybody! It’s hilarious, touching, and will have you at the edge of your seat by the end of the crazy journey! 

…Aaaaannd, now it’s on Netflix! If you don’t have it, you can also watch it here: http://www.goodanime.net/tokyo-godfathers-movie

Go watch it!

(via fujoshiism)

(Source: aerobicblaine, via fujoshiism)





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